Git Forking Workflow

Transitioning over from Git Branching Workflow suggested by Vincent Driessen at nvie to Git Forking Workflow for Gunrock.

How Forking Workflow Works?

Forking Workflow As in the other Git workflows, the Forking Workflow begins with an official public repository stored on a server. But when a new developer wants to start working on the project, they do not directly clone the official repository.

Instead, they fork the official repository to create a copy of it on the server. This new copy serves as their personal public repository—no other developers are allowed to push to it, but they can pull changes from it (we’ll see why this is important in a moment). After they have created their server-side copy, the developer performs a git clone to get a copy of it onto their local machine. This serves as their private development environment, just like in the other workflows.

When they're ready to publish a local commit, they push the commit to their own public repository—not the official one. Then, they file a pull request with the main repository, which lets the project maintainer know that an update is ready to be integrated. The pull request also serves as a convenient discussion thread if there are issues with the contributed code.

To integrate the feature into the official codebase, the maintainer pulls the contributor’s changes into their local repository, checks to make sure it doesn’t break the project, merges it into his local master branch, then pushes the master branch to the official repository on the server. The contribution is now part of the project, and other developers should pull from the official repository to synchronize their local repositories.

Gunrock's Forking Workflow

gunrock/gunrock:

(personal-fork)/gunrock

Note that transitioning to this type of workflow from branching model doesn't require much effort, we will just have to start working on our forks and start creating pull requests to one dev branch.

How to contribute?